Common Hop

Common Hop Plant Information


Common Hop grows in the following 46 states:

Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, District Of Columbia, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Oregon, West Virginia, Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington

H. lupulus is an ingredient in most beers, and as such is widely cultivated for use by the brewing industry. The fragrant flower cones, known as hops, impart bitterness and flavor, and also have preservative qualities.H. lupulus contains myrcene, humulene, xanthohumol, myrcenol, linalool, tannins, and resin.Humulus lupulus (common hop or hop) is a species of flowering plant in the Cannabaceae family, native to Europe, western Asia and North America. It is a dioecious, perennial, herbaceous climbing plant which sends up new shoots in early spring and dies back to a cold-hardy rhizome in autumn. Strictly speaking it is a bine rather than a vine, using its own shoots to act as supports for new growth.

The five varieties of this species (Humulus lupulus) are:
Many cultivated varieties are found in the list of hop varieties. A pale, ornamental variety, Humulus lupulus 'Aureus', is cultivated for garden use. It is also known as golden hop, and holds the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit (AGM).
H. lupulus was voted the county flower of Kent in 2002 following a poll by the wild flora conservation charity Plantlife.

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